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Treat and Beat Athlete's Foot


Are your feet feeling a little itchy these days? Are they red, with a burning sensation? Do you have cracked or flaky skin between your toes? Uh-oh. This is starting to sound very familiar. I’m afraid that you may have a case of Athlete’s Foot. What’s that you say? You’re not an athlete? Well, unfortunately you don’t have to be. Keep reading to find out all the dirty details on this uncomfortable condition.

Are your feet feeling a little itchy these days? Are they red, with a burning sensation? Do you have cracked or flaky skin between your toes?

Uh-oh. This is starting to sound very familiar. I’m afraid, my dear friend, that you may have a case of Athlete’s Foot.  I’m here to tell you, I am very familiar with those symptoms. As an athlete, I struggle with Athlete’s Foot (or tinea pedis, its scientific name) a few times a year.

What’s that you say? You’re not an athlete? Well, unfortunately you don’t have to be. Keep reading to find out all the dirty details on this uncomfortable condition.

All About Athlete’s Foot
Athlete’s Foot is a contagious skin infection caused by a fungus that is found in damp, warm environments, such as showers, saunas, hot tubs, locker rooms and around indoor pools. It spreads mainly when bare feet come into direct contact with the fungus, but it can also spread through contact with bed sheets and clothes that have become infected with the fungus.

Oops, that’s probably how I gave it to my husband (he’s not an athlete anymore, either). But shhh . . . don’t tell him - he doesn’t know I’m to blame.

Symptoms
Itching is a major sign of Athlete’s Foot, but other symptoms include redness, burning, and cracked skin and blisters on the soles of the feet or between the toes. When Athlete’s Foot spreads to the toes, the condition is known as onchomycosis and can make the toenails thicken and look discolored, even separate from the nail bed and split or fall off.

Ewwww. OK, moving on.

Who is at risk?
Teenagers and adult men are more likely to get Athlete’s Foot than women (guess I’m an anomaly of that statistic). It is also believed that some people are more susceptible to Athlete’s Foot than others due to genetic and hereditary factors, which may explain why, out of a group of people exposed to the fungus, some will get it and others will not.

Treatment Options
Left untreated, Athlete’s Foot can linger for months or even years, but it isn’t something you just have to tolerate. Be sure to wash your feet frequently, and take care to dry them thoroughly—especially between the toes. Medicated powders and ointments (including terbinafine, sold commercially under the name Lamisil) can weaken the fungus that causes Athlete’s Foot or kill the fungus directly.

On the all-natural front, regular applications of tea tree oil to affected areas may improve symptoms and stop the spread of the fungus.

If your case of Athlete’s Foot has already spread to your toes, consult your doctor immediately.

So now you know!
If you suffer from Athlete’s Foot, don’t let it get you down. The treatment options mentioned above are very effective (I can attest to that), and can often eliminate your symptoms in a few days. And by following the prevention tips you can be fungus-free in the future.



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